Weekly roundup of altM news: Oct. 31

GETTY

With all the stories on the Internet it can be difficult to always stay in the know. To help, we’ve searched the web for interesting pieces of news, videos and tips to help you start off your week on the right foot.

1. How to solve the difficult problem of adding ‘Muslim’ to ‘American’

‘Peg + Cat’ is an animated PBS series that follows the spirited Peg and her sidekick Cat. (PBS)

‘Peg + Cat’ is an animated PBS series that follows the spirited Peg and her sidekick Cat. (PBS)

LA Times columnist Rhonda Roumani writes about her 6-year-old daughter’s joy when she discovered her favorite television show “Peg+Cat” had an episode devoted to celebrating Eid Mubarak.

“The adults were as gratified by Peg and Cat’s adventure as my daughter was,” Roumani writes. “One friend was almost in tears. I couldn’t stop smiling. It was a sweet, simple expression of what Eid al-Adha means to us, on kids’ TV, as a matter of course. Such a moment of complete cultural acceptance is something Muslims don’t experience too often these days.”

Such a moment of complete cultural acceptance is something Muslims don’t experience too often these days,”  Rhonda Roumani writes about Peg+Cat’s Eid Mubarak episode.  Tweet This!

 

 

2. Fourth Graders Shatter Lies

3. The Loving Legacy

Yesica Suarez and Akshaan Arora met in college. She's from Venezuela; he's from India. She's a devout Catholic; he's a Hindu-turned-atheist. She grew up speaking Spanish and watching telenovelas; he grew up speaking Hindi and watching Bollywood musicals.

Yesica Suarez and Akshaan Arora met in college. She’s from Venezuela; he’s from India. She’s a devout Catholic; he’s a Hindu-turned-atheist. She grew up speaking Spanish and watching telenovelas; he grew up speaking Hindi and watching Bollywood musicals. Photo/Michael S. Williamson

In honor of Mildred and Richard Loving, the duo that dared to become felons when they got married in Virginia in 1958, The Washington Post writes about five mixed-race couples living in Virginia.

“She was black, he was white, and that was a crime in Virginia and 23 other states,” journalist, Steve Hendrix writes. “They were arrested, convicted and banished from their home state. But their legal fight led to the 1967 landmark Supreme Court ruling in Loving v. Virginia that ended miscegenation laws in the 16 states where they were still on the books.”

The Washington Post honors the Lovings, the duo that dared to become felons when they got married in Virginia in 1958, by writing about five mixed-race couples living in Virginia today  Tweet This!

 

4. A Special Election Playlist for All the “Nasty” Women Out There

GETTY

GETTY

Elle editor Estelle Tang writes about the “glorious list of tunes” that Elle Magazine gathered so “that you can blast while defying anyone who thinks that calling a woman ‘nasty’ is a suave political move.”

The list was in part of a massive response (ie. merchandise and meme explosion) to Donald Trump muttering that Hillary Clinton was “such a nasty woman” during the final presidential debate. Elle’s playlist includes Janet Jackson’s “Nasty” and more.

 

5. The Secret History of Elizabeth I’s Alliance With Islam

Queen Elizabeth I of England reached out to Islamic leaders "for hard-nosed political and commercial reasons," says author Jerry Brotton. Photo/GL Archive, Alamy

Queen Elizabeth I of England reached out to Islamic leaders “for hard-nosed political and commercial reasons,” says author Jerry Brotton. Photo/GL Archive, Alamy

National Geographic’s Simon Worrall writes about Jerry Brotton‘s new book The Sultan and the Queenwhich explored the little known history of English-Muslim alliances. Worrall writes that in the book Brotton “explains why Elizabeth believed Islam and Protestantism had more in common with each other than with Catholicism and how this cultural exchange may have inspired Shakespeare’s plays and turned the queen’s teeth black.”

 

altM’s weekly roundup of news  Tweet This!

This list was curated by Kaitlin Montgomery, altM News Editor

 

 

1 Comment

  • world news says:

    The Washington Post honors the Lovings, the duo that dared to become felons when they got married in Virginia in 1958, by writing about five mixed-race couples living in Virginia today

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *